Plaintiffs Refile in Gill v. Whitford Redistricting Case

Democratic plaintiffs in Gill v. Whitford, the legal challenge to Wisconsin Republicans’ 2010 redistricting map, have refiled their case in district court. A three-judge panel (Chief U.S. District Judge James Peterson, appointed by President Barack Obama; 7th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Kenneth Ripple, appointed by President Ronald Reagan; and U.S. District Judge William […]

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Online Sales Tax Scope Statement Approved

Gov. Scott Walker has approved a Department of Revenue (DOR) scope statement amending rules related to the collection of online sales taxes. The rule will allow DOR to collect Wisconsin’s 5 percent sales tax from online sellers without a physical presence in the state beginning on Oct. 1, 2018. The scope statement says the rule […]

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U.S. Supreme Court Decides Plaintiffs in Redistricting Case Lack Standing

In a long-awaited decision of this term, the U.S. Supreme Court decided the plaintiffs in Gill v. Whitford, the legal challenge to Wisconsin Republicans’ 2010 redistricting map, lack standing to challenge the statewide map. The Court remanded the case to district court, giving the plaintiffs another opportunity to demonstrate concrete injuries to their individual votes. […]

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SCOTUS Decision: Epic Systems v. Lewis (Arbitration Agreements)

The U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision this week in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, holding that individualized arbitration contracts between employers and employees that waive class actions are enforceable under the Federal Arbitration Act. Previously, courts and the National Labor Relations Board have held that individualized arbitration agreements are enforceable. However, a 2012 NLRB […]

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Supreme Court Hears Oral Arguments in Wisconsin Redistricting Case

On Tuesday, Oct. 3, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Gill v. Whitford, the legal challenge to Wisconsin Republicans’ redistricting map brought by Democratic voters against officials of the Wisconsin Elections Commission. In their questioning, Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch suggested the challengers may not have legal standing […]

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State Files Opening Brief in SCOTUS Redistricting Case

State Files Opening Brief in SCOTUS Redistricting Case

Last week, Attorney General Brad Schimel filed with the U.S. Supreme Court the opening brief in Gill v. Whitford, the legal challenge to Wisconsin Republicans’ redistricting map brought by Democratic voters against officials of the Wisconsin Elections Commission. In the brief, Schimel argues that the Supreme Court should dismiss the district court decision because the […]

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SCOTUS to Hear Wisconsin Redistricting Case

On June 19, the U.S. Supreme Court announced it will review the legal challenge to the Republicans’ redistricting map. By 5-4 vote, the Supreme Court also granted Attorney General Brad Schimel’s request to stay the lower court’s order requiring a timely redrawing of the Assembly district map. The redistricting case, Gill v. Whitford, was brought […]

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President Trump Nominates Judge Neil Gorsuch to Supreme Court

President Trump Nominates Judge Neil Gorsuch to Supreme Court

Neil Gorsuch, a 49-year-old appellate judge in Colorado, was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Trump on Tuesday. Born in Denver, Colorado, Judge Gorsuch attended Georgetown Preparatory School in Washington, D.C. while his mother led the Environmental Protection Agency under President Reagan. He completed his undergraduate degree at Columbia University and went on to […]

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AG Schimel Sues EPA over New Ozone Standard

Wisconsin joined a coalition of states and industry groups challenging EPA’s new ozone standard. The new standard was released on October 26, 2015, and lowers the ozone standard to 70 parts per billion (ppb). The states filed their brief in the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia on April 22, 2016. […]

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Evenwel v. Abbott – “One Person, One Vote”

The Supreme Court unanimously rejected a challenge by two Texas voters to the “one person, one vote” principle. The plaintiffs argued that Texas violated the Equal Protection Clause by drawing districts that contained approximately the same total population, but varying amounts of eligible voters. Justice Ginsburg writing for the Court held “based on constitutional history, […]

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